Medical Reports & Forms

Please note that if you have a medical report or form that needs to be completed by a doctor, then this must be handed in to reception staff or posted to the practice. If an appointment is required we will contact you to arrange a mutually convenient time.

Please allow up to 28 days for the completion of any such paperwork as the practice does receive a large number of requests on a daily basis. We will always aim to complete any such paperwork within a 28 day timeframe but sometimes this is not possible. 

Please note that there may also be a fee for completing any such report. Some of these fees may be payable by the patient or by the organisation requesting the report or form.

This includes but is not limited to; Insurance reports, Life Assurance forms, Benefits claims, Driving licence countersignatures, Occupational Health Reports, Private medical reports and Medical examinations etc…

A list of suggested charges is available at reception or you contact us via eConsult from the homepage of this website to ask about a specific request/charge.

 

Why GPs sometimes charge fees

Surely the doctor is being paid anyway?

It is important to understand that many GPs are not employed by the NHS.

They are self-employed and they have to cover their costs - staff, buildings, heating, lighting, etc - in the same way as any small business. The NHS covers these costs for NHS work, but for non-NHS work, the fees charged by GPs contribute towards their costs.

 

What is covered by the NHS and what is not?

The Government’s contract with GPs covers medical services to NHS patients, including the provision of ongoing medical treatment.

In recent years, however, more and more organisations have been involving doctors in a whole range of non-medical work.

Sometimes the only reason that GPs are asked is because they are in a position of trust in the community, or because an insurance company or employer wants to ensure that information provided to them is true and accurate.

Examples of non-NHS services for which GPs can charge their own NHS patients:

·         accident or sickness certificates for insurance purposes

·         school fee and holiday insurance certificates

·         reports for health clubs to certify that patients are fit to exercise

 

For more information please click on this link to the BMA website:

https://www.bma.org.uk/advice/employment/fees/why-gps-charge-fees

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